“Great Men of Music” Beethoven, Chopin, Dvorak, Haydn, Tchaikovsky, Verdi

$95.00

“Great Men of Music” Beethoven, Chopin, Dvorak, Haydn, Tchaikovsky, Verdi

Ludwig van Beethoven (/ˈlʊdvɪɡ væn ˈbtvən/ (About this soundlisten); German: [ˈluːtvɪç fan ˈbeːtˌhoːfn̩] (About this soundlisten); baptized 17 December 1770 – 26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist whose music ranks amongst the most performed of the classical music repertoire; he remains one of the most admired composers in the history of Western music. His works span the transition from the classical period to the romantic era in classical music. His career has conventionally been divided into early, middle, and late periods. The “early” period, during which he forged his craft, is typically considered to have lasted until 1802. From 1802 to around 1812, his “middle” period showed an individual development from the “classical” styles of Joseph Haydn and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and is sometimes characterized as “heroic.” During this time he began to suffer increasingly from deafness. In his “late” period from 1812 to his death in 1827, he extended his innovations in musical form and expression.

Frédéric François Chopin (UK: /ˈʃɒpæ̃/, US: /ʃˈpæn/,[1][2] French: [ʃɔpɛ̃], Polish: [ˈʂɔpɛn]), born Fryderyk Franciszek Chopin (1 March 1810 – 17 October 1849), in Poland also known as Fryderyk Szopen,[3] was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist of the Romantic era who wrote primarily for solo piano. He has maintained worldwide renown as a leading musician of his era, one whose “poetic genius was based on a professional technique that was without equal in his generation.”

Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (Italian: [dʒuˈzɛppe ˈverdi]; 9 or 10 October 1813 – 27 January 1901) was an Italian opera composer. He was born near Busseto to a provincial family of moderate means, and developed a musical education with the help of a local patron. Verdi came to dominate the Italian opera scene after the era of Vincenzo Bellini, Gaetano Donizetti, and Gioachino Rossini, whose works significantly influenced him.

Antonín Leopold Dvořák (/d(ə)ˈvɔːrʒɑːk, –ʒæk/ d(ə-)VOR-zha(h)k, Czech: [ˈantoɲiːn ˈlɛopold ˈdvor̝aːk] (About this soundlisten); 8 September 1841 – 1 May 1904) was a Czech composer, one of the first to achieve worldwide recognition. Following the Romantic-era nationalist example of his predecessor Bedřich Smetana, Dvořák frequently employed rhythms and other aspects of the folk music of Moravia and his native Bohemia. Dvořák’s own style has been described as “the fullest recreation of a national idiom with that of the symphonic tradition, absorbing folk influences and finding effective ways of using them”.

Haydn spent much of his career as a court musician for the wealthy Esterházy family at their remote estate. Until the later part of his life, this isolated him from other composers and trends in music so that he was, as he put it, “forced to become original”.[c] Yet his music circulated widely, and for much of his career he was the most celebrated composer in Europe.

He was a friend and mentor of Mozart, a tutor of Beethoven, and the older brother of composer Michael Haydn.

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky[a 2] (English: /ˈkɒfski/ chy-KOF-skee;[1] Russian: Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский,[a 3] IPA: [pʲɵtr ɪlʲˈjitɕ tɕɪjˈkofskʲɪj] (About this soundlisten); 7 May 1840 – 6 November 1893[a 4]) was a Russian composer of the Romantic period. He was the

first Russian composer whose music made a lasting impression internationally.

He was honored in 1884 by Tsar Alexander III and awarded a lifetime pension.
Although musically precocious, Tchaikovsky was educated for a career as a civil servant. There was scant opportunity for a musical career in Russia at the time and no system of public music education. When an opportunity for such an education arose, he entered the nascent Saint Petersburg Conservatory, from which he graduated in 1865. The formal Western-oriented teaching that he received there set him apart from composers of the contemporary nationalist movement embodied by the Russian composers of The Five with whom his professional relationship was mixed.

Availability: 1 in stock

“Great Men of Music” Beethoven, Chopin, Dvorak, Haydn, Tchaikovsky, Verdi

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review ““Great Men of Music” Beethoven, Chopin, Dvorak, Haydn, Tchaikovsky, Verdi”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *